Sixty-Day Superhero – Day Thirty-Six

I want to talk about a semi-uncomfortable subject. It’s one of the two subjects as a server or bartender you shouldn’t bring up to customers. Those two subjects are politics and religion. And I want to talk about beliefs.

I think beliefs are important. I am not actually putting my beliefs above yours, nor do I expect to understand anyone’s spirituality. I hardly know my own, and realized how much of a learning experience trying to it words to mine is I cannot judge.

I have never fully given into Christianity. There was something that didn’t make sense to me about it all. It started with the idea of the crusaders. One religion fought against another religion. Christianity being one of those religions led it to be hypocritical. I had already begun to read about Greek mythology and Egyptian mythology. I’d seen comics with Thor in them. All of these other gods were definitively in my periphery. So, I studied what I needed to study in confirmation. I got confirmed. I even once gold told while talking about fictional witches that witches were in fact real.

As I got older, I started to look at religions on the internet. I found comic books spouting different types of religions based on the organized religions I knew. I studied a bit of Wicca. I looked at Tarot cards. It wasn’t until I was coming up that the first piece of the puzzle fell into place.

I was reading ‘The Exclusive Embrace’ by Daniel Mendelsohn. I was just coming out back in South Dakota. I had already had my first gay experience years before. I knew Christianity found it wrong. I had sex with a woman, and it felt wrong. It was when Mendelsohn was discussing the ‘men and de’ of Greek that I found the first piece. “Sex between men dissolves otherness into sameness, men into de, in a perfect suspension: there is nothing that either party doesn’t know about the other” (74). This idea truly penetrated me through and through. It made sense.

It wasn’t until years later that when reading Promethea by Alan Moore that these thoughts continued. Moore uses the character and book Promethea to showcase his own religion. I remember reading somewhere that he said something along the lines of writing the story because he saw all the other books on other religions, that there should be a place for this. I didn’t really understand it, but after reading Promethea all the way through, I began to put more pieces together.

I saw myself in the story. I saw myself starting in the material world that weighs you down and this world of the imagination that sits beyond it. I saw the character starting at the bottom of the Tree of Life and moving up it. It all made sense to me, and there was a warmth about it all. When I finished it, I passed it on to my best friend. She read it, and passed it on to her brother.

Two years later, I read ‘The Secret’ which talked about the laws of attraction. You put out into the world what will be returned to you. You attract it to you. All of these little pieces flowed together and made sense in my life. Now, I’m reading a book on meditation, and the New World, and it all once again combines to form this. This is such a long journey to find something beyond me, and it’s wonderful.

I do not care if you follow Christianity or Science, Agnostic or Jewish, you should believe in something. It’ll help you on a journey to help you find fulfillment. It may not even be in the thing you’re believing, but that can lead you to the right place. I’ve been thinking about it a lot lately, and as lots of superheroes believe in a lot of different things, I figured I’d throw this out there into the mix.

Mendelsohn, Daniel. The Exclusive Embrace: The Desire and Riddle of Identity. Vintage Books. 1999.

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